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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the scam which brought down the c.i.a. director spread further. now it is the actions of the top u.s. commander in afghanistan called into question. failing its mandate, the bbc gains access into an internal report showing the united nations failed to protect civilians in sri lanka. >> they left actually at the moment the population needed them more than ever. the government wanted them out of the way essentially because they didn't want anyone to see what was happening. >> running the world in just a week. a marathon man on a mission that boo leave most of us in the dust. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. bizarre. it is the only way to describe the scandal that has already claimed the job of the c.i.a. director and now has america's top commander in afghanistan under investigation. both are strange enough, but how do you explain the addition of a shirtless f.b.i. agent and 30,000 e-mails. here is the latest. >> it is a washington drama with a stellar cast. the spy chief, the top general and two women who soon found themselves at the heart o
to washington-- if the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff, it would push the economy into a recession. and late today, a top credit rating agency puts the odds of going off the cliff at 15%. plus, how g.o.p. economic policies could change as election day demographics change. that and more tonight on nbr! the u.s. economy would be driven into recession next year if the fiscal cliff is not solved in time. that's the warning again today from the congressional budget office. and the standard and poor's ratings agency said there's an increasing chance we will go over that cliff of tax increases and spending cuts. it puts the odds at 15%. still, s&p is optimistic about a solution, saying "the most likely scenario, in our view, is that policymakers reach sufficient political compromise in time to avoid most, if not all, potential economic effects of the cliff." both s&p and the congressional budget office warned unemployment would go over 9% by the end of next year if the cliff is triggered. those s&p comments hit the market in the last 30 minutes of trading, extending yesterday's sharp losses. the do
business. >> reporter: it used to be consumers would buy private label products to clean their bathrooms or wash their clothes. lately, however, they're eating them, too. from sodas to peanut butter, private label brands are shaking off the yuck! stigma and attracting value-conscious customers. and it's the popularity of private label food that's behind the tasty conagra-ralcorp deal. >> private label, otherwise known as store brands, is gaining traction with retailers and shoppers. in fact, store brands have been growing faster than branded food for some time, and we expect that to continue. >> reporter: it might be hard to believe, but store brands now account for about a fifth of all packaged foods sold in the u.s., and at 70 $billion, we're talking big business. conagra is known for name brands like pam, slim jim, and reddi whip, and it also makes some private label goods. ralcorp is the top manufacturer of growing store brand categories such as cereal and pasta, and it supplies companies like walmart and mcdonald's. together, conagra and ralcorp could become a private label powerhou
-elect, enrique pena nieto, this afternoon. one topic for them and for us tonight: the war on drugs, on both sides of the border. >> suarez: as lawmakers talk of reducing the country's debt, paul solman offers a history lesson on centuries of federal borrowing. >> the united states was going into default. we defaulted on many obligations to foreign creditors and to our own soldiers. >> brown: plus, every month, 1,000 young americans are infected with h.i.v., and most of those with the disease don't even know they have it. hari sreenivasan looks at a new report from the c.d.c. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. th
to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: part two of our conversation with oliver stone and peter kusnick. their 10-part series on showtime kicks off next monday night. now is another preview of "the. history of the united states. " -- "the untold story of the united states. " >> i steadied american history. it made sense. we were the center of the world. there was manifest destiny and we were the good guys. i have traveled the world now. i continue my education as an infantryman in vietnam. made a lot of movies, some of them about history. and i have learned a lot more about what i once knew. and when i heard from my children what they're learning in school, i was perturbed that they were not getting the more honest view of the world and i did. we lived most of our lives in a fog. but i will let my children to have access to something that looks beyond what i recall as the tyranny of now. >> material now. tavis: the you think a 10-part series on showtime, a companion book
and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election of 2012. >> reporter: mr. obama departed his hometown of chicago this afternoon for washington, his home for another four years. waiting for him: a still- divided congress now facing a critical lame duck session.
for business leaders. the c.e.o. of caesars entertainment, tells us it'll be "very damaging" for his company. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! wall street greeted the election results with a big sell-off in stocks. investors dumped shares of almost every type, giving the s&p 500 it's worst day since june. beyond the u.s. elections, europe also brought fresh worries for investors with concerns in greece, and germany. here's how the numbers stacked up on wall street. the dow lost 312 points, at it's worst point of the day, the blue chip index was down 369 points. the nasdaq tumbled nearly 75 points and the s&p 500 off 33. suzanne pratt takes a look at where the market goes from here. >> reporter: let's be candid. this is not the election outcome that wall street wanted to see. after all many investors believe president obama's tax policies will hurt corporate profits. on top of that there's the likelihood of more regulation in the president's second term. those concerns were evident in selling today of energy, banking and healthcare stocks. a quick look at the price board at the new
with israel, people are used to the airstrikes that come, the craters that pockmark the countryside and that destroy their buildings. let's face, it's happened now every few years. so when you come here, you'll find a sense of relief and immediate happiness, of course, but people are pretty skeptical about whether the peace will last. >> ( translated ): god willing i hope it holds but i'm 50/50. they've been breaking their promises since the prophet's day. >> reporter: mobility scooter meets hamas flag. ahmed atah lost both legs in the last israeli invasion. so, will a ceasefire become a peace? "it could," he said, "but first we need to give thanks to president morsi of egypt." across gaza, he's something of a new hero, and they're even impressed in israel. the egyptian president right now the best hope for peacekeeping here. >> egypt was able to regain it's regional role as a regional player, mediating between the israelis and the palestinians in convincing both of them to reach a ceasefire agreement. in the city, the flags, the rallies, talking up victory. in the countryside, the
. in the past, military strikes have been used to send messages about the toughness of israeli leaders. >> we will take whatever action is necessary to put a stop to this. this is not merely our right. it is also our duty. >> hamas has sworn to hit back. they said the same thing during the last gossan warner -- gazan war. this showed limitations against israel's army. before the assassination, the egyptian government had been working to establish a cease- fire, and efforts have been praised by top security officials. egypt's president is a leader of the muslim brotherhood. the assassination will be seen as a calculated and dangerous insult. egypt strongly condemns what israel is doing in gaza. this is an unacceptable act, and we deeply condemn it. >> what has changed since the war? the west and israel have lost their most reliable friend, and egypt's president mubarak. they saw him as an indispensable part of the solution at times like this. >> heightened tensions in the middle east tonight. in other news from around the world, the united nations secretary general ban ki moon has set a report
, showing that unless there's a deal on solving the crisis, the u.s. economy would suffer big time. the obama administration's economists estimate consumers would spend about $200 billion less next year than they would have otherwise. congress and the administration have only a few more weeks to nail down a deal. but that deal will have to address some tough issues, including entitlement reform. darren gersh explains. >> reporter: the big money in entitlements is in health care, and that means any grand bargain to avoid the fiscal cliff will slice away at one of the nation's most popular programs. >> medicare is clearly in the gunsights. >> reporter: it's possible congress and the president could agree to save $300 to $400 billion from medicare by cutting fees for doctors and hospitals. but analysts worry slashing payments won't make the health care system more efficient. >> this is not really a way to structurally change medicare and if you don't change the underlying incentives, you don't get long-term savings. >> reporter: progressives at the center for american progress say the
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)